About Baby acne

Many newborns develop baby acne, usually on the cheeks, chin and forehead. Baby acne isn’t pretty, but it’s common — and temporary. There’s little you can do to prevent baby acne. The best treatment for baby acne is usually none at all.

Symptoms

Baby acne is usually characterized by small red bumps on a baby’s cheeks, chin and forehead. Baby acne often develops within the first three to four weeks after birth. Baby acne may look worse when your baby is fussy or crying.

Many babies also develop tiny white bumps on the nose, chin or cheeks. These are known as milia.

Causes

Baby acne is usually caused by hormonal changes that occurred during pregnancy. Baby acne is more common in boys. Rarely, baby acne is a sign of a hormonal problem.

Diagnosis

Baby acne is easily spotted on a baby’s skin. No specific testing is needed.

Treatment

Baby acne typically disappears on its own within several weeks. In some cases, however, baby acne lingers for months or even longer.

In the meantime:

  • Keep your baby’s face clean. Wash your baby’s face with warm water two or three times a day.
  • Dry your baby’s face gently. Simply pat your baby’s skin dry.
  • Don’t pinch or scrub the acne. You may cause more irritation or an infection.

If your baby’s acne is particularly stubborn, your baby’s doctor may recommend a medicated cream or other treatment. Rarely, any underlying conditions may need to be treated as well.

There’s little you can do to prevent baby acne. Simply wash your baby’s face with warm water and look forward to the clearer days ahead.