Diabetes: Chipotle spiced shrimp

Though shrimp is higher in cholesterol than most meat and poultry, it’s lower in fat and saturated fat. And fat, not cholesterol, has the greatest effect on blood cholesterol. Shrimp also has omega-3 fatty acids, a type of fat that’s good for your heart.

Chipotle spiced shrimp

2/3 cup dried chickpeas (garbanzos), picked over and rinsed, soaked overnight, and drained
3 cups water
2 cloves garlic
1 bay leaf
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sliced green (spring) onion
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (fresh coriander)
1 teaspoon ground cumin

Directions

Rinse shrimp in cold water. Pat dry with a paper towel and set aside on a plate.

To make the marinade, whisk together the tomato paste, water and oil in a small bowl. Add garlic, chili powder and oregano. Mix well.

Using a brush, spread the marinade (it will be thick) on both sides of the shrimp. Place in the refrigerator.

Prepare a hot fire in a charcoal grill or heat a gas grill or broiler (grill). Away from the heat source, lightly coat the grill rack or broiler pan with cooking spray. Position the cooking rack 4 to 6 inches from the heat source.

Put the shrimp in a grill basket or on skewers and place on the grill. Turn the shrimp after 3 to 4 minutes. The cooking time varies depending on the heat of the fire, so watch carefully.

Transfer to a plate and serve immediately.

Nutritional Analysis

Serving size: 8 shrimp
Calories 73 Cholesterol 85 mg
Protein 12 g Sodium 151 mg
Carbohydrate 3 g Fiber 1 g
Total fat 2 g Potassium 199 mg
Saturated fat trace Calcium 37 mg
Monounsaturated fat 1 g