Tag Archives: heart attack

About heart attack

A heart attack usually occurs when a blood clot blocks the flow of blood through a coronary artery — a blood vessel that feeds blood to a part of the heart muscle. Interrupted blood flow to your heart can damage or destroy a part of the heart muscle.

Years ago, a heart attack was often fatal. Thanks to better awareness of heart attack signs and symptoms and improved treatments, most people who have a heart attack now survive.

Your overall lifestyle — what you eat, how often you exercise and the way you deal with stress — plays a role in your recovery from a heart attack. In addition, a healthy lifestyle can help you prevent a first or subsequent heart attack by controlling risk factors that contribute to the narrowing of the coronary arteries that supply blood to your heart.

Symptoms

Common signs and symptoms of a heart attack include: Continue reading About heart attack

About prehypertension

Blood pressure is the force exerted on your artery walls as blood flows through your body. Slightly elevated blood pressure is known as prehypertension. Left untreated, prehypertension is likely to progress to definite high blood pressure. Both prehypertension and high blood pressure increase your risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

A blood pressure reading has two numbers. The first, or upper, number measures the pressure in your arteries when your heart beats (systolic pressure). The second, or lower, number measures the pressure in your arteries between beats (diastolic pressure). Normal blood pressure is below 120 systolic/80 diastolic as measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). Prehypertension is a systolic pressure from 120 to 139 or a diastolic pressure from 80 to 89.

When prehypertension was defined as a new category of blood pressure in 2003, many people who Continue reading About prehypertension

About Dressler’s syndrome

Dressler’s syndrome is a complication that can occur following a heart attack or heart surgery. It occurs when the sac that surrounds your heart (pericardium) becomes inflamed. An immune system reaction is thought to be responsible for Dressler’s syndrome, which usually develops several weeks or months after heart tissue injury.

Dressler’s syndrome causes fever and chest pain, which can feel like another heart attack. Also referred to as post-pericardiotomy and post-myocardial infarction syndrome, Dressler’s syndrome is treated with medications that reduce inflammation.

With recent improvements in the medical treatment of heart attack, Dressler’s syndrome is far less common than it used to be. However, once you’ve had the condition, it may recur, so it’s important to be on the lookout for any symptoms of Dressler’s syndrome if you’ve had a heart attack, heart surgery or other heart injury.

Symptoms

Dressler’s syndrome causes the following signs and symptoms after heart surgery, a heart attack or an injury to your heart: Continue reading About Dressler’s syndrome

About Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

Left ventricular hypertrophy is enlargement (hypertrophy) of the muscle tissue that makes up the wall of your heart’s main pumping chamber (left ventricle).

Left ventricular hypertrophy develops in response to some factor, such as high blood pressure, that requires the left ventricle to work harder. As the workload increases, the walls of the chamber grow thicker, lose elasticity and eventually may fail to pump with as much force as a healthy heart.

If you have left ventricular hypertrophy, you’re at increased risk of heart disease, including heart attack, heart failure, irregular heartbeats (arrhythmia) and sudden cardiac arrest.

The incidence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) increases with age and is more common in people who have high blood pressure or other heart problems.

Symptoms

Left ventricular hypertrophy usually develops gradually. You may experience no signs or symptoms, especially during the early stages of development. When signs or symptoms are present, they may include: Continue reading About Left Ventricular Hypertrophy